Issues

Quality Education as a Human Right:

As a product of public schools and an employee in the education policy space, I have seen the condition of our academic institutions. Students don’t underperform; instead, they don’t receive access to the necessary resources and support to succeed. Despite our state’s wealth, California ranks at the bottom, considering the proportion of funding for K-12 education. Consequently, underfunded schools fail our most marginalized communities. 

However, we can raise our literacy and numeracy benchmarks by doing more for public schools- starting with fully funding our public school system. We can also support more after-school programs ranging from tutoring services to the arts and universal transitional kindergarten that would assist younger children and their parents. We can also incorporate critical core lessons such as financial and media literacy, empowering students for life after high school.

Furthermore, the community school model should be replicated across every neighborhood that would benefit from wrap-around services. Health and mental care services, community refrigerators, and on-site community representatives from city and county departments to assist residents with their needs would go a long way to help uplift historically marginalized communities. We must work to integrate our systems instead of having them completely separated. 

Finally, I support increasing accountability for charter schools that receive public tax dollars. We have seen how easy it has been for charter schools, with no public budgeting process, to misuse public funds intended for our students’ education. By law, traditional public schools serve all students, regardless of their unique learning abilities, zip code, or performance; however, charter schools don’t always have the resources to do the same. As a big sister to a K-12 student on the autism spectrum, I want to make sure my brother and all students who need additional support can flourish academically. We cannot continue to fund new charter schools if their institutions cannot serve all students equally. Education is a human right; all students deserve access to a quality education that will prepare them academically and socially to pursue the career of their choice. 

Housing as a Human Right:

I know firsthand how working families struggle to secure housing stability because I grew up in publicly subsidized housing. Overall, California is losing its power and influence around the nation due to the amount of people leaving the state because of the high cost of living. Fixing the housing crisis should be easier, but representatives around the state prefer to keep the status quo, allowing luxury developments to come into our communities instead of prioritizing affordable housing. Housing is a human right; not one Californian should live without a roof over their head. 

My plan for housing includes repealing the Costa Hawkins and Ellis Act, expanding renter protections, and fast-tracking affordable housing to meet our demand. However, the state must also make additional support available for first-time home buyers who want homeownership opportunities. To ensure housing availability for working families, we must stop corporate hedge funds from purchasing our single-family homes across California. I am calling for a ban on corporate-owned single-family homes that artificially reduce home availability and raise nearby rent. It is also essential to ensure that small mom-and-pop landlords have the support to keep their units on the market and contribute to our overall housing supply.

Housing development should prioritize allowing communities to work where they live. Individuals should not have to commute long hours a day to work because they can’t afford to live near their place of work. Housing should be near transit, grocery stores, green spaces, schools, and other essential services. I am also calling on the state to stop the sprawl. It would help make our cities more walkable and allow for better public transit systems.

Furthermore, I strongly support Social Housing, a key solution to fixing the affordability crisis by creating publicly funded housing with mixed-income units, which ultimately help subsidize each other and keep rent affordable. Protecting individuals must also include cracking down hard on cities that refuse to build new, affordable housing. If the current laws are too relaxed, more critical laws need to be introduced to push for development and not wait for court cases that could set back the creation of housing for months or even years.

Healthcare as a Human Right:

We’ve read the stories and heard the testimonies; healthcare is a nightmare in the United States. Our healthcare system is also one of the most complex, which includes private insurance provided by your employer or accessible through the marketplace, publicly financed programs by the state and federal government (Medicare, Medi-Cal, Veterans Administration), and out-of-pocket costs composed of premiums, deductibles, and copays. As a result, over 530,000 Americans nationwide annually declare bankruptcy due to medical debt, according to a 2019 study from the American Journal of Public Health. While other developed nations have figured out how to make healthcare more affordable, our representatives continue to be influenced by insurance and pharmaceutical lobbyists and have failed to do the right thing for Americans. 

Even in California, with a majority Democratic legislature, our healthcare system is not serving all Californians.  Starting in 2024, eligible undocumented adults can apply for Medi-Cal. However, despite this expansion, we are still far from enshrining health care as a human right for everyone. There are over 3.2 million Californians who don’t have any type of health coverage, of which there are over half a million undocumented individuals who will not be able to qualify for Medi-Cal nor make enough to have private insurance. As your State Assemblymember, I will be a staunch fighter for CalCare – a single-payer healthcare system that would secure affordable and accessible healthcare to all, regardless of employment or immigration status. 

As long as healthcare costs remain exuberant, there will always be a group of people who cannot afford it. Studies show that a single-payer healthcare system would cut administrative costs, run more efficiently, and yield considerable long-term savings to the state. The best part is that everyone would have coverage without worrying about filing for bankruptcy or putting off much-needed medical treatment due to cost.

Women’s Rights: 

Freedom is only legitimate if you have total autonomy over your body. Having the right to make health decisions for your body is fundamental. Therefore, I am a proud pro-choice candidate. To protect women’s rights, we must also discuss menstrual equity, workplace accommodations, maternal care, and the gender pay gap. I hear so many stories of how many women suffer from heavy, very painful, and sometimes intolerable menstrual cycles. As a feminist, I am in support of legislation that would protect menstrual leave in the workplace so that women have the opportunity to use sick time during their menstrual cycles without retaliation. 

Furthermore, Latina earners have the highest wage gap of all other women groups, making only 52 cents to every dollar earned by white men. These practices hurt working-class families, especially single-parent households across California. I support a living wage that can help bridge the pay gap for women and also improve the overall quality of life for everyone.

Homelessness:

California is the 4th largest economy in the world. What good is that fact for the people who have been priced out and have no alternative but to live on the street? Many suffer from poor mental health and substance abuse issues due to our broken healthcare system. Current policies have contributed to this, and solutions will not be fast or cheap. However, investing in worthwhile long-term affordable housing, mental health and substance abuse programs, and job training can help reduce the number of people on the street.

Furthermore, the system continues to fail our unhoused community. Think about it: to apply for a job, you need an address, access to a computer, and a driver’s license. Many unhoused individuals have lost access to documentation, such as state ID cards, social security cards, passports, and other important documents because they don’t have a secure place to store these items. Lacking access to this crucial information diminishes their job prospects and ability to apply for much-needed social services and support programs. We can and will change these rules to help people get back on their feet.

Jobs:

Opening our state to faster housing development and efficient transition to renewable energy sources would also create better job opportunities for all. But not just any job opportunities; well-paying jobs with great benefits and union jobs. Many people are leaving the state today due to the high cost of living and sub-standard wages.

Recent weather and environmental changes have underscored an urgent need to upgrade our infrastructure. Our state must fast-track the hire of Californians to build and maintain our roads, dams, levies, water storage systems, and other infrastructure needs, including enhancing and developing better public transit systems such as rail and buses. 

While the California minimum wage is now up to $16 an hour, working families need more to survive in this state.  Many companies and large corporations have exploited workers for too long, offering workers only the bare minimum. As someone who joined workers on the picket line, I will fully stand with my union brothers and sisters to demand fair wages, better benefits, and improved working conditions. Record corporate profits must also equate to record wage increases for workers. 

While states like Iowa and Florida are getting rid of child labor protections, California must do the opposite, not as a means of spite but because a child belongs in school, not in the workplace. However, current law states that children can legally work starting at age 12. While the state has set certain protections in place, such as being unable to work on school days and limiting the number of hours children can work, I don’t believe it goes far enough. I propose that we raise the minimum age for minors to be allowed to work from age 12 to 14 and emphasize the importance of education for the well-being of the child as well as severe punishment for those who seek to exploit children through labor, especially when it comes to children working in dangerous factories or field labor, where they are most likely to exhibit bodily injury.

Public Safety:

Our current criminal justice system is not built for the diversity we celebrate. It means the system must change along with the culture of accountability, or lack thereof. Our low-income minority communities have historically been overpoliced and underresourced. That is why I am proposing the hiring of more social workers to meet the needs of many emergencies that are related to mental health or domestic abuse. We must also expand the notion of community policing, officers assisting people on the street, connecting them with potential services, and contacting social workers rather than arresting them.

Moreover, the era of internal investigations should have ended long ago. I plan to eliminate internal auditors and investigators within law enforcement departments and set up separate entities to independently review critical situations in case of possible unethical or illegal behavior. Cooperation with investigations must be non-negotiable, with evidence being turned in to the investigative body expeditiously. The California Department of Justice should consider severe consequences, such as suspension without pay for agencies that fail to comply. 

It’s time to disband gangs within the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department. As your Assembly Member, I will do everything in my power to stop the terrorization of our communities by bad actors in our law enforcement agencies, and it starts by ensuring accountability and transparency. 

Furthermore, even with some of the strongest gun violence prevention laws in the country, California still falls short in securing the safety of our communities. We need to do better in getting firearms off the hands of those who pose a threat to public safety and cracking down on ghost guns and the interstate movement of firearms. As a Los Angeles School District legislative analyst, I ensured our district supported state bills such as SB 2 (Portantino) that helped establish sensitive zones in school areas where concealed weapons were not allowed. I will continue to be a fighter for commonsense gun reform policies and gun violence prevention efforts. 

Public Transit:

Yet another area where we fall woefully short in America. However, the people are chanting for better alternatives for movement, and I am there shouting with them. Recently, Mayor Karen Bass has expanded hours and pushed for more frequent trains on the Los Angeles Metropolitan Transportation Authority (LA Metro) system. We should capitalize on this opportunity by calling for more significant investment in mass public transit statewide. I strongly support a fareless transit system that will get Angelinos out of their cars and into buses or trains to help us meet the state’s 2030 climate goals. 

To make public transit work for everyone, we need to support humane safety measures so riders can get to their destinations without issues, fareless transit, fair wages for transit workers, and more funds to expand service across the County of Los Angeles. 

Environment and Energy:

Studies show California is one of the states with the highest burden of economic costs associated with climate-related disasters. Our proximity to the coast and vast forests means we are prone to uncontrollable wildfires and widespread flooding. 

In 2015, ExxonMobile reports dating back to the 1970s revealed that climate change was real and man-made, yet still paid absurd amounts to convince politicians and the public otherwise. Now, oil companies want us to clean up the mess they have made while pulling in record profits. California has over 35,000 idle oil wells, with at least 30 leaking methane in Kern County. Some oil wells are near homes, apartments, or community spaces such as churches and schools. Estimates say it would take $21.5 billion of taxpayer money to clean it all up. Join me in telling the oil industry to use their profits to clean it up. It is time to crack down on the most egregious polluters that threaten our climate and the livelihood of our communities.

The State of California has made numerous investments in green energy, but companies such as Southern California Edison and Pacific Gas and Electric have hampered efforts. Recently, the California Public Utilities Commission voted to reduce how much consumers can make when selling energy back to utility companies. Imagine allowing utility companies to raise the amount of money they can charge the public for power usage but only paying a low price for the power that the public sells to them, and then the very same company turning around to sell that energy back to the public at a high price – that is our current reality. That is unfair to the schools, churches, businesses, and individuals who bought into solar panels.  

After years of utility companies delving into criminal behavior, join me in saying to them that enough is enough. If Southern California Edison and PG&E cannot get their act together, it is time to consider a government takeover and return public utilities to the public. 

Furthermore, our neighbors of Assembly District 52 in East Los Angeles continue to live with contaminated soil in their years due to Exide. The Department of Toxic Sub Substances Control has failed to remediate homes properly, leaving many with unacceptable lead levels in their soil. As Assemblymember, I will fight for our communities facing environmental discrimination,  advocate to accelerate proper remediation efforts, and hold polluters accountable for the harm they cause to our communities. 

Small Businesses:

Small businesses are the lifeline of our economy. As of 2022, California had over 4 million small businesses, which accounted for 99.8 percent of all businesses in the state. Furthermore, small businesses employ 48 percent of our statewide workforce. Despite our economy’s dependency on them, small businesses continue to suffer, many of which did not return after the pandemic. As your Assemblymember, I will support expanding small business grant opportunities and additional support and resources for minority and women-owned businesses. 

Campaign Finance Reform:

In 2022, one of the most significant sources of outside spending in California legislative races came from oil, gas, and electric utilities (“California Campaign Finance: Industry Groups Give Big,” CalMatters, Nov. 3, 2022). While our working-class families are having to grapple with the impact of fossil fuels in their communities, these same players are out there funding candidate’s political campaigns. I am the only candidate in this race who has taken the No Fossil Fuel Pledge and vowed to prioritize our families’ health and wellness, climate, and democracy by not accepting contributions from oil, gas, and coal industry executives, lobbyists, or PACs. I support a significant reform of our campaign finance system that would limit the influence of outside money in our elections while also moving toward publicly financed elections for members of our State Legislature. We need more regular Californians, not connected to the ultra-wealthy in our state, to be able to run for office and win. Publicly financed elections with a matching funds system, like that of the City of Los Angeles, have successfully contributed to electing more women, people of color, and working-class Californians. It’s time that regular Californians take control of our state elections. 

Unincorporated Communities:

Over 5 million people in California live in an unincorporated community or Census Designated Place. These residents live in neighborhoods without direct access to local representatives, as they need a City or Town Council to advocate for their local needs. Instead, county governments responsible for regional governance absorb unincorporated communities and don’t often serve their constituents adequately. In 2022, unincorporated communities in the San Joaquin Valley lacked essential services such as clean running water. Furthermore, residents of unincorporated communities have historically been treated as second-class citizens and have faced far too many systemic injustices. 

As the Assemblymember who would represent the largest urban unincorporated community in our state, East Los Angeles, I will support policy fixes that will improve governance and representation of unincorporated communities, as well as create a more accessible pathway towards incorporation for communities that choose to pursue that route.

  • Quality Education as a Human Right:
  • Housing as a Human Right:
  • Healthcare as a Human Right:
  • Women’s Rights:
  • Homelessness:
  • Jobs/Unions/Wages:
  • Public Safety:
  • Public Transit:
  • Environment and Energy:
  • Small Businesses:
  • Campaign Finance Reform:
  • Unincorporated Communities:

As a product of public schools and an employee in the education policy space, I have seen the condition of our academic institutions. Students don’t underperform; instead, they don’t receive access to the necessary resources and support to succeed. Despite our state’s wealth, California ranks at the bottom, considering the proportion of funding for K-12 education. Consequently, underfunded schools fail our most marginalized communities. 

However, we can raise our literacy and numeracy benchmarks by doing more for public schools- starting with fully funding our public school system. We can also support more after-school programs ranging from tutoring services to the arts and universal transitional kindergarten that would assist younger children and their parents. We can also incorporate critical core lessons such as financial and media literacy, empowering students for life after high school.

Furthermore, the community school model should be replicated across every neighborhood that would benefit from wrap-around services. Health and mental care services, community refrigerators, and on-site community representatives from city and county departments to assist residents with their needs would go a long way to help uplift historically marginalized communities. We must work to integrate our systems instead of having them completely separated. 

Finally, I support increasing accountability for charter schools that receive public tax dollars. We have seen how easy it has been for charter schools, with no public budgeting process, to misuse public funds intended for our students’ education. By law, traditional public schools serve all students, regardless of their unique learning abilities, zip code, or performance; however, charter schools don’t always have the resources to do the same. As a big sister to a K-12 student on the autism spectrum, I want to make sure my brother and all students who need additional support can flourish academically. We cannot continue to fund new charter schools if their institutions cannot serve all students equally. Education is a human right; all students deserve access to a quality education that will prepare them academically and socially to pursue the career of their choice. 

I know firsthand how working families struggle to secure housing stability because I grew up in publicly subsidized housing. Overall, California is losing its power and influence around the nation due to the amount of people leaving the state because of the high cost of living. Fixing the housing crisis should be easier, but representatives around the state prefer to keep the status quo, allowing luxury developments to come into our communities instead of prioritizing affordable housing. Housing is a human right; not one Californian should live without a roof over their head. 

My plan for housing includes repealing the Costa Hawkins and Ellis Act, expanding renter protections, and fast-tracking affordable housing to meet our demand. However, the state must also make additional support available for first-time home buyers who want homeownership opportunities. To ensure housing availability for working families, we must stop corporate hedge funds from purchasing our single-family homes across California. I am calling for a ban on corporate-owned single-family homes that artificially reduce home availability and raise nearby rent. It is also essential to ensure that small mom-and-pop landlords have the support to keep their units on the market and contribute to our overall housing supply.

Housing development should prioritize allowing communities to work where they live. Individuals should not have to commute long hours a day to work because they can’t afford to live near their place of work. Housing should be near transit, grocery stores, green spaces, schools, and other essential services. I am also calling on the state to stop the sprawl. It would help make our cities more walkable and allow for better public transit systems.

Furthermore, I strongly support Social Housing, a key solution to fixing the affordability crisis by creating publicly funded housing with mixed-income units, which ultimately help subsidize each other and keep rent affordable. Protecting individuals must also include cracking down hard on cities that refuse to build new, affordable housing. If the current laws are too relaxed, more critical laws need to be introduced to push for development and not wait for court cases that could set back the creation of housing for months or even years.

We’ve read the stories and heard the testimonies; healthcare is a nightmare in the United States. Our healthcare system is also one of the most complex, which includes private insurance provided by your employer or accessible through the marketplace, publicly financed programs by the state and federal government (Medicare, Medi-Cal, Veterans Administration), and out-of-pocket costs composed of premiums, deductibles, and copays. As a result, over 530,000 Americans nationwide annually declare bankruptcy due to medical debt, according to a 2019 study from the American Journal of Public Health. While other developed nations have figured out how to make healthcare more affordable, our representatives continue to be influenced by insurance and pharmaceutical lobbyists and have failed to do the right thing for Americans. 

Even in California, with a majority Democratic legislature, our healthcare system is not serving all Californians.  Starting in 2024, eligible undocumented adults can apply for Medi-Cal. However, despite this expansion, we are still far from enshrining health care as a human right for everyone. There are over 3.2 million Californians who don’t have any type of health coverage, of which there are over half a million undocumented individuals who will not be able to qualify for Medi-Cal nor make enough to have private insurance. As your State Assemblymember, I will be a staunch fighter for CalCare – a single-payer healthcare system that would secure affordable and accessible healthcare to all, regardless of employment or immigration status. 

As long as healthcare costs remain exuberant, there will always be a group of people who cannot afford it. Studies show that a single-payer healthcare system would cut administrative costs, run more efficiently, and yield considerable long-term savings to the state. The best part is that everyone would have coverage without worrying about filing for bankruptcy or putting off much-needed medical treatment due to cost.

Freedom is only legitimate if you have total autonomy over your body. Having the right to make health decisions for your body is fundamental. Therefore, I am a proud pro-choice candidate. To protect women’s rights, we must also discuss menstrual equity, workplace accommodations, maternal care, and the gender pay gap. I hear so many stories of how many women suffer from heavy, very painful, and sometimes intolerable menstrual cycles. As a feminist, I am in support of legislation that would protect menstrual leave in the workplace so that women have the opportunity to use sick time during their menstrual cycles without retaliation. 

Furthermore, Latina earners have the highest wage gap of all other women groups, making only 52 cents to every dollar earned by white men. These practices hurt working-class families, especially single-parent households across California. I support a living wage that can help bridge the pay gap for women and also improve the overall quality of life for everyone.

California is the 4th largest economy in the world. What good is that fact for the people who have been priced out and have no alternative but to live on the street? Many suffer from poor mental health and substance abuse issues due to our broken healthcare system. Current policies have contributed to this, and solutions will not be fast or cheap. However, investing in worthwhile long-term affordable housing, mental health and substance abuse programs, and job training can help reduce the number of people on the street.

Furthermore, the system continues to fail our unhoused community. Think about it: to apply for a job, you need an address, access to a computer, and a driver’s license. Many unhoused individuals have lost access to documentation, such as state ID cards, social security cards, passports, and other important documents because they don’t have a secure place to store these items. Lacking access to this crucial information diminishes their job prospects and ability to apply for much-needed social services and support programs. We can and will change these rules to help people get back on their feet.

Opening our state to faster housing development and efficient transition to renewable energy sources would also create better job opportunities for all. But not just any job opportunities; well-paying jobs with great benefits and union jobs. Many people are leaving the state today due to the high cost of living and sub-standard wages.

Recent weather and environmental changes have underscored an urgent need to upgrade our infrastructure. Our state must fast-track the hire of Californians to build and maintain our roads, dams, levies, water storage systems, and other infrastructure needs, including enhancing and developing better public transit systems such as rail and buses. 

While the California minimum wage is now up to $16 an hour, working families need more to survive in this state.  Many companies and large corporations have exploited workers for too long, offering workers only the bare minimum. As someone who joined workers on the picket line, I will fully stand with my union brothers and sisters to demand fair wages, better benefits, and improved working conditions. Record corporate profits must also equate to record wage increases for workers. 

While states like Iowa and Florida are getting rid of child labor protections, California must do the opposite, not as a means of spite but because a child belongs in school, not in the workplace. However, current law states that children can legally work starting at age 12. While the state has set certain protections in place, such as being unable to work on school days and limiting the number of hours children can work, I don’t believe it goes far enough. I propose that we raise the minimum age for minors to be allowed to work from age 12 to 14 and emphasize the importance of education for the well-being of the child as well as severe punishment for those who seek to exploit children through labor, especially when it comes to children working in dangerous factories or field labor, where they are most likely to exhibit bodily injury.

Our current criminal justice system is not built for the diversity we celebrate. It means the system must change along with the culture of accountability, or lack thereof. Our low-income minority communities have historically been overpoliced and underresourced. That is why I am proposing the hiring of more social workers to meet the needs of many emergencies that are related to mental health or domestic abuse. We must also expand the notion of community policing, officers assisting people on the street, connecting them with potential services, and contacting social workers rather than arresting them.

Moreover, the era of internal investigations should have ended long ago. I plan to eliminate internal auditors and investigators within law enforcement departments and set up separate entities to independently review critical situations in case of possible unethical or illegal behavior. Cooperation with investigations must be non-negotiable, with evidence being turned in to the investigative body expeditiously. The California Department of Justice should consider severe consequences, such as suspension without pay for agencies that fail to comply. 

It’s time to disband gangs within the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department. As your Assembly Member, I will do everything in my power to stop the terrorization of our communities by bad actors in our law enforcement agencies, and it starts by ensuring accountability and transparency.

Yet another area where we fall woefully short in America. However, the people are chanting for better alternatives for movement, and I am there shouting with them. Recently, Mayor Karen Bass has expanded hours and pushed for more frequent trains on the Los Angeles Metropolitan Transportation Authority (LA Metro) system. We should capitalize on this opportunity by calling for more significant investment in mass public transit statewide. I strongly support a fareless transit system that will get Angelinos out of their cars and into buses or trains to help us meet the state’s 2030 climate goals. 

To make public transit work for everyone, we need to support humane safety measures so riders can get to their destinations without issues, fareless transit, fair wages for transit workers, and more funds to expand service across the County of Los Angeles.

Studies show California is one of the states with the highest burden of economic costs associated with climate-related disasters. Our proximity to the coast and vast forests means we are prone to uncontrollable wildfires and widespread flooding. 

In 2015, ExxonMobile reports dating back to the 1970s revealed that climate change was real and man-made, yet still paid absurd amounts to convince politicians and the public otherwise. Now, oil companies want us to clean up the mess they have made while pulling in record profits. California has over 35,000 idle oil wells, with at least 30 leaking methane in Kern County. Some oil wells are near homes, apartments, or community spaces such as churches and schools. Estimates say it would take $21.5 billion of taxpayer money to clean it all up. Join me in telling the oil industry to use their profits to clean it up. It is time to crack down on the most egregious polluters that threaten our climate and the livelihood of our communities.

The State of California has made numerous investments in green energy, but companies such as Southern California Edison and Pacific Gas and Electric have hampered efforts. Recently, the California Public Utilities Commission voted to reduce how much consumers can make when selling energy back to utility companies. Imagine allowing utility companies to raise the amount of money they can charge the public for power usage but only paying a low price for the power that the public sells to them, and then the very same company turning around to sell that energy back to the public at a high price – that is our current reality. That is unfair to the schools, churches, businesses, and individuals who bought into solar panels.  

After years of utility companies delving into criminal behavior, join me in saying to them that enough is enough. If Southern California Edison and PG&E cannot get their act together, it is time to consider a government takeover and return public utilities to the public.

Small businesses are the lifeline of our economy. As of 2022, California had over 4 million small businesses, which accounted for 99.8 percent of all businesses in the state. Furthermore, small businesses employ 48 percent of our statewide workforce. Despite our economy’s dependency on them, small businesses continue to suffer, many of which did not return after the pandemic. As your Assemblymember, I will support expanding small business grant opportunities and additional support and resources for minority and women-owned businesses.

In 2022, one of the most significant sources of outside spending in California legislative races came from oil, gas, and electric utilities (“California Campaign Finance: Industry Groups Give Big,” CalMatters, Nov. 3, 2022). While our working-class families are having to grapple with the impact of fossil fuels in their communities, these same players are out there funding candidate’s political campaigns. I am the only candidate in this race who has taken the No Fossil Fuel Pledge and vowed to prioritize our families’ health and wellness, climate, and democracy by not accepting contributions from oil, gas, and coal industry executives, lobbyists, or PACs. I support a significant reform of our campaign finance system that would limit the influence of outside money in our elections while also moving toward publicly financed elections for members of our State Legislature. We need more regular Californians, not connected to the ultra-wealthy in our state, to be able to run for office and win. Publicly financed elections with a matching funds system, like that of the City of Los Angeles, have successfully contributed to electing more women, people of color, and working-class Californians. It’s time that regular Californians take control of our state elections.

Over 5 million people in California live in an unincorporated community or Census Designated Place. These residents live in neighborhoods without direct access to local representatives, as they need a City or Town Council to advocate for their local needs. Instead, county governments responsible for regional governance absorb unincorporated communities and don’t often serve their constituents adequately. In 2022, unincorporated communities in the San Joaquin Valley lacked essential services such as clean running water. Furthermore, residents of unincorporated communities have historically been treated as second-class citizens and have faced far too many systemic injustices. 

As the Assemblymember who would represent the largest urban unincorporated community in our state, East Los Angeles, I will support policy fixes that will improve governance and representation of unincorporated communities, as well as create a more accessible pathway towards incorporation for communities that choose to pursue that route.

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Paid for by Genesis Coronado for Assembly 2024, FPPC #1460984